gbertb
By:
gbertb

Best guide to setup a wordpress site that potentially will get 10k visits a day

November 27, 2014 2.5k views

Can someone point me to any guides to setting up a rock solid nginx + varnish + wordpress with digital ocean that can withstand over 10k hits a day.

3 comments
  • "....withstand over 10k hits a day."

    If you do the number you'll see that 10k visits a day hardly counts for any amount of load at all.

    With an even spread 10k visits a day turns into something like 417 visits per hour, and 7 visits per minute.

    Even with the majority of your users in the same timezone, with more traffic during peak hours, etc it really doesn't translate into more than a few simultaneous users.

  • Mine works fine with Apache and WordPress's own caching plug in called W3TC..

    512MB droplet running zPanel on CentOS 6.5 x32 along with 512MB swap..

    Though I find a 1GB droplet would have been better since I am right on the edge of resource usage but due to financial constrain I am trying my level best to keep it in 512MB plan..

    So far so good, its been close to 4 months, not a single problem.. Fingers crossed :P

    Load primarily depends on different plug ins / themes of WordPress you are using, some translate to smooth operation, some turns out to be resource hogger !!

  • All you need is Wordpress Super Cache plugin and Nginx and you should be able to scale easily. My blog can handle blitz.io 8,000 user tests for 237 million hits/day on DO 2GB VPS - see all my benchmarks at http://wordpress7.centminmod.com/

2 Answers

This question was answered by @hunky:

Mine works fine with Apache and WordPress's own caching plug in called W3TC..

512MB droplet running zPanel on CentOS 6.5 x32 along with 512MB swap..

Though I find a 1GB droplet would have been better since I am right on the edge of resource usage but due to financial constrain I am trying my level best to keep it in 512MB plan..

So far so good, its been close to 4 months, not a single problem.. Fingers crossed :P

Load primarily depends on different plug ins / themes of WordPress you are using, some translate to smooth operation, some turns out to be resource hogger !!

View the original comment

This series also covers a production wordpress deploy which should be set up for higher load and also allow you to see monitor the server activity to see how it handles the traffic: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorial_series/building-for-production-web-applications

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