eyup
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eyup

Best Wordpress Setup for $10 droplet.

March 9, 2015 5.7k views
Apache One-Click Install Apps WordPress Linux Basics Getting Started Ruby on Rails Email LAMP Stack Ubuntu

Hi everyone,

Being tired of slow shared hosting, I did some research on alternative webhosting methods and stumpled upon DigitalOcean while looking for a VPS powered Wordpress host. There are several providers ofc, but I was attracted to the 1-click install packages that DigitalOcean has to offer.

When it comes to Linux, and even on running a server, I am a total noob. However, I do have some IT knowledge to get myself started. So not your average quitter, will search and search and try and try till I get it working. However, I dunno if I can use that right now. Anyways, to get to the actual question:

I want to run a WooCommerce (Wordpress) website. What is the best option to go for? I value high speed, as that was one of my main problems with previous methods. I understand nginx would run faster as opposed to apache? Also, although I understand that it is not recommended, what are your thoughts on running a mailserver on your own server, and in my case next to the Woo website?

Long story short, should i got for the 1-click Wordpress, or should I choose one of the other stacks, LAMP, etc for my needs?

Thanks in advance

6 comments
  • I use Apache, but mainly because I am already familiar with it and have not invested the time into learning Nginx.
    I have read that Nginx has slightly better performance. Having said that, Wordpress + Apache + DigitalOcean has worked for me for the last several months with no hiccups.

    Running a mailserver can be a pain to set up, but is totally possible. If you decide to go that route, you may save yourself some headache by using Google as your SMTP server and just use your droplet as a mail receiver, so to speak.

    I have a $5.00 droplet running a Woocommerce website for a small local business that does a nice amount of selling online.
    I had their site on a managed hosting account (Dreamhost VPS), but kept having issues. Once I moved the site to a DO droplet, it has been smooth sailing.

    I personally prefer to just set up a bare-bones Ubuntu server and then install everything myself. That way I know exactly where things are.
    Once I have things set up nicely, I save that droplet as an image, and use that to spin up new droplets.

    Whatever route you take, ( Nginx, Apache, LAMP, etc..) just stick with it, learn how to get things running and be consistent with everything you do.
    If you have a note-taking application, start a section for saving notes as you go along (I use Tomboy Notes)

  • Thank you for your reply.

    Is the $5 droplet sufficient for WooCommerce in terms of speed? Also, on the mail server side, with my knowledge, would it be smart to run my own mail server or would you recommend getting email hosting else where? What are the pros and cons?

  • So far the $5 droplet has been sufficient to run the Woocommerce site; however, the site is for a small local business..they probably get around 500 ~ 1000 visitors each week.

    For the mail-server: I have one running on a droplet for a few of my personal emails. Works fine. However, if the emails were critical to a business, I would not use that, as it can be a pain to run a mail server, and if it ever crashed it would be a massive headache.

    For business emails, I usually set people up with Google Apps...which is easy to set up.

    For non-critical emails, that would not matter if the server crashed and was unavailable for a day...it is okay to run your own server.

  • We will be selling niche products, so I guess that droplet your mentioning could do the job for us. Just to clarify though, and I'm really asking for your experience here, would there be major differences in speed with the 5 or 10 dollar droplet? The only major difference seems to be the RAM (something that would effect speed).

    Also, to continue on this subject, would a preinstalled Wordpress droplet be better or easier than for example a LAMP stack?

  • A preinstalled Wordpress droplet is basically a LAMP stack with Wordpress added. It might be a good starting place for you if you are not familiar with setting up Apache and some basic websites.

    I have never used any of the preinstalled or one-click options, and am glad I have not because I forced myself how to learn to set up Apache and MySQL...this makes trouble-shooting easier because I know exactly where to look.

    Having said that, you have to start somewhere, and if a one-click install will get you going, then go for it. You can always tweak things as you go along. It is basically a jump-start.

  • Thanks alot sierracircle, I have started a 1 click app to play with and get it going. Could you help with an issue I'm having? I made another question here, but basically while im logged in through SSH, my sftp root@hostname is asking for a password? What am I doing wrnog?

1 Answer

This question was answered by @sierracircle:

I use Apache, but mainly because I am already familiar with it and have not invested the time into learning Nginx.
I have read that Nginx has slightly better performance. Having said that, Wordpress + Apache + DigitalOcean has worked for me for the last several months with no hiccups.

Running a mailserver can be a pain to set up, but is totally possible. If you decide to go that route, you may save yourself some headache by using Google as your SMTP server and just use your droplet as a mail receiver, so to speak.

I have a $5.00 droplet running a Woocommerce website for a small local business that does a nice amount of selling online.
I had their site on a managed hosting account (Dreamhost VPS), but kept having issues. Once I moved the site to a DO droplet, it has been smooth sailing.

I personally prefer to just set up a bare-bones Ubuntu server and then install everything myself. That way I know exactly where things are.
Once I have things set up nicely, I save that droplet as an image, and use that to spin up new droplets.

Whatever route you take, ( Nginx, Apache, LAMP, etc..) just stick with it, learn how to get things running and be consistent with everything you do.
If you have a note-taking application, start a section for saving notes as you go along (I use Tomboy Notes)

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