Question

DNS routing question - to many options

Hello, after reading

  1. How To Point to DigitalOcean Nameservers From Common Domain Registrars
  2. How does DO verify domain ownership?
  3. How do I map subdomain from Godaddy to DO Droplet?
  4. How do you point a subdomain to DigitalOcean without using or the original domain or changing nameservers?

I still have difficulties understanding the domain lookup routing

I have domain mysweetdomain.love registered at the domain registrars MyRegistrarsBuddy and would like to add a forum using the discourse droplet and shall be accisble by the subdomain discourse.mysweetdomain.love

Now I have to options that discourse.mysweetdomain.love can be reached by all the nerds around the world.

  1. use DigitalOcean nameservers, what can be changed in the DNS settings area of my domain registrars
    This means to tell my MyRegistrarsBuddy to ask ns1.digitalocean.com to tell him where to find the asset (app) associated to the domain name.
    That means if a user types discourse.mysweetdomain.love his DNS provider (most likely his internet service provider, IPS) will ask other nameservers (DNS server provider) who is the owner of mysweetdomain.love, ending up at nameserver of MyRegistrarsBuddy. The IPS will ask him where discourse.mysweetdomain.love is located. This in turn causes my MyRegistrarsBuddy to ask DigitalOcean nameservers where the droplet is located, who in turn responses with its IP address

  2. add in A record pointing to the IP address of the droplet This causes that my MyRegistrarsBuddy knows exactly where the droplet is located. That means if a user types discourse.mysweetdomain.love his DNS provider (his IPS) will ask other nameservers who is the owner of mysweetdomain.love, ending up at nameserver of MyRegistrarsBuddy. The IPS will ask him where discourse.mysweetdomain.love is located. As I added an A record pointing to the IP address of the droplet, the nameserver of MyRegistrarsBuddy responses with the correct IP address.

What I still don’t understand, why NS records (ns1.digitalocean.com, ns2.digitalocean.com, ns3.digitalocean.com) are added automatically do the DNS records in the domain management of my project?


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Hello,

yes both your points are correct.

Adding ns1/ns2.digitalocean.com as you nameservers will actually force you to manage your DNS for Digital Ocean. This won’t be a bad idea as you’ll have your droplets configured here as well.

As for your Question number 3. The NS are actually added by default. A domain name, can’t have proper DNS without it having available NS.

Kind regards, Kalin D.

Hi StefanMueller83,

I’m not sure I fully understand your last question but let me try and clarify your situation and what would be best in my opinion.

Changing your nameservers

If you change your nameservers to

You will control your DNS from Digital Ocean. This means, you’ll manage all your records like A, MX, CNAME etc from DO.

Pointing only the A record of the subdomain

Now, this process will be simpler now and with few steps but might create some confusion in your end after some time.

Let me clarify, it’s easier to just change your A record of discourse.mysweetdomain.love to point to your new droplet. Changing the A record would ensure your subdomain loading from your droplet. That’s it, you would be ready to go.

The negative part would be everytime you need to do a DNS change, you’ll need to login to your MyRegistrarsBuddy account and manage the records from there.

In your situation, I would suggest the second option. Once you have a wider knowledge of how DNS work, it would be a peace of cake to just change your NS

Let me know if this answer was actually helpful to your situation.

@Kdimitrov thank you for the quick answers but I cannot follow you wording

  1. Question 4 -> force you to manage?
    what do you mean by force you to manage? Do you mean I’m forced to manage all DNS related things within the control panel of Digital Ocean instead in the settings of the Domain Registrar?

Adding ns1/ns2.digitalocean.com as you nameservers will actually force you to manage your DNS for Digital Ocean.

Moreover, assume that I have [apps on vultr.com](https://www.vultr.com/features/one-click-apps/) reachable as subdomains of ``mysweetdomain.love``, DSN things mangaged on vultr.com. That makes it necessary to add ```ns1.vultr.com``` too.   

As I have limited nameserver entries I would do

  1. ns2.uk.domains.coop Domain Registrar’s nameserver (for the main domain site, hosted on e.g. siteground once and forever)
  2. ns1.digitalocean.com Digital Ocean’s nameserver
  3. ns1.vultr.com Vultr’s nameserver
Are they any reasons I should not do it like this besides redundancy/availability concerns 
  1. Question 3 -> DNS without it having available NS You mean a nameserver must be aware of it. By adding NS - discourse.mysweetdomain.love - ns2.digitalocean.com, the Digital Ocean’s nameserver ns2, is aware of discourse.mysweetdomain.love, isn’t it?

The NS are actually added by default. A domain name, can’t have proper DNS without it having available NS