Question

Is it safe to remove rpcbind?

Hello,

I have a fresh Debian 8.1 x64 droplet and I noticed that rpcbind is enabled listening on port 111.

Is it safe to completely remove it (rpcbind) along with nfs-common package ?

Is it needed by Digital Ocean in someway I may not be aware of?

Thank you, any help appreciated.

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for systemd: get root stop the service: #systemctl stop rpcbind.service disable the service:#systemctl disable rpcbind.service

for systemd: get root stop the service: #systemctl stop rpcbind.service disable the service:#systemctl disable rpcbind.service

It is safe.

Debian installs (not just digital Ocean) default to running rpcbind and rpc.statd

Both of these services are only needed if you plan on using NFS for file sharing. They are otherwise unneeded and are a potential security risk.

You can disable them by running the following commands as root: update-rc.d nfs-common disable update-rc.d rpcbind disable

That will prevent them from starting at boot, but they will continue if already running until you reboot or stop them yourself.

It is safe.

Debian installs (not just digital Ocean) default to running rpcbind and rpc.statd

Both of these services are only needed if you plan on using NFS for file sharing. They are otherwise unneeded and are a potential security risk.

You can disable them by running the following commands as root: update-rc.d nfs-common disable update-rc.d rpcbind disable

That will prevent them from starting at boot, but they will continue if already running until you reboot or stop them yourself.

It is safe.

Debian installs (not just digital Ocean) default to running rpcbind and rpc.statd

Both of these services are only needed if you plan on using NFS for file sharing. They are otherwise unneeded and are a potential security risk.

You can disable them by running the following commands as root: update-rc.d nfs-common disable update-rc.d rpcbind disable

That will prevent them from starting at boot, but they will continue if already running until you reboot or stop them yourself.

It is safe.

Debian installs (not just digital Ocean) default to running rpcbind and rpc.statd

Both of these services are only needed if you plan on using NFS for file sharing. They are otherwise unneeded and are a potential security risk.

You can disable them by running the following commands as root: update-rc.d nfs-common disable update-rc.d rpcbind disable

That will prevent them from starting at boot, but they will continue if already running until you reboot or stop them yourself.

It is safe.

Debian installs (not just digital Ocean) default to running rpcbind and rpc.statd

Both of these services are only needed if you plan on using NFS for file sharing. They are otherwise unneeded and are a potential security risk.

You can disable them by running the following commands as root: update-rc.d nfs-common disable update-rc.d rpcbind disable

That will prevent them from starting at boot, but they will continue if already running until you reboot or stop them yourself.

It is safe.

Debian installs (not just digital Ocean) default to running rpcbind and rpc.statd

Both of these services are only needed if you plan on using NFS for file sharing. They are otherwise unneeded and are a potential security risk.

You can disable them by running the following commands as root: update-rc.d nfs-common disable update-rc.d rpcbind disable

That will prevent them from starting at boot, but they will continue if already running until you reboot or stop them yourself.

It is safe.

Debian installs (not just digital Ocean) default to running rpcbind and rpc.statd

Both of these services are only needed if you plan on using NFS for file sharing. They are otherwise unneeded and are a potential security risk.

You can disable them by running the following commands as root: update-rc.d nfs-common disable update-rc.d rpcbind disable

That will prevent them from starting at boot, but they will continue if already running until you reboot or stop them yourself.

Thank you. Very helpful!