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Upgrading Shared CPU to Dedicated CPU

Is it possible to upgrade a Shared CPU droplet to a Dedicated CPU droplet?


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I want a shared CPU

Talk about a downgrade, when did you guys decide to shift the business model to shared hosting aka “shared CPU” or was this always the case? Is the CPU shared between all your nodes or server-wide?

Hi, @upcellnow

You can resize your droplet at any time. Resizing a server, also known as vertical scaling, increases the amount of resources a server has. Increasing its memory and CPU improves its performance, and increasing the size of its disk increases the amount of data you can store.

There are two resizing options for Droplets:

  • CPU and RAM only. This option lets you increase or decrease the amount of CPU and RAM available to a Droplet.
  • Disk, CPU, and RAM. This option increases the amount of CPU and RAM available to a Droplet and permanently increases the size of a Droplet’s disk.

Considerations Before Resizing

  • You cannot decrease the size of a Droplet’s disk. In other words, disk resizes are irreversible.

Data is not always sequentially written in memory, so reducing the available space would risk data loss and filesystem corruption. For more flexibility, you can use block storage volumes for additional data storage, which lets you detach or delete the volume if you no longer need the space.

  • Allow for about one minute of downtime per GB of used disk space, though the actual time necessary is typically shorter. You can check the disk storage on the filesystem with df / -h.

Estimated downtime depends on disk usage even for resizes that don’t change the amount of disk space. This is because the Droplet may move to a new hypervisor, which transfers disk data over the network.

  • We strongly recommend taking a snapshot of the Droplet before resizing.

Droplets may change hypervisors during a resize, and any changes to a filesystem can lead to data loss if something goes wrong. We strongly recommend backing up the Droplet’s data before resizing. If you use snapshots, you can delete the snapshot after confirming that the resize was successful.

You can find the full information here: https://www.digitalocean.com/docs/droplets/how-to/resize/

Hope that this helps! Regards, Alex