Question

What is Enable User Data?

  • Posted October 29, 2014

What does the Enable User Data option provide? I don’t understand the meaning.

Subscribe
Share

Selecting Enable User Data allows you to input a Bash script to customize your server during provisioning. In theory, this could do anything you want, but most might use it to run a repo update/upgrade or install some software automatically. The real power comes when interacting via the API, as you could bring servers up and down passing scripts each time to setup the server as needed.

More info here: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/an-introduction-to-droplet-metadata


Submit an answer
You can type!ref in this text area to quickly search our full set of tutorials, documentation & marketplace offerings and insert the link!

These answers are provided by our Community. If you find them useful, show some love by clicking the heart. If you run into issues leave a comment, or add your own answer to help others.

The Enable User Data setting allows you to pass arbitrary data into the user-data key of the DigitalOcean Metadata service. You can then retrieve that data on your droplet by running:

curl -w "\n" http://169.254.169.254/metadata/v1/user-data

On it’s own, that’s not very exciting but it allows for some interesting things when you combine it with a program called CloudInit that is installed by default on Ubuntu 14.04 and up as well as CentOS 7. It processes the user data and runs it on the droplet. For instance, you could put a bash script in there and it will be run on first boot. People use this to do a lot of initial set up on their droplets like installing packages. For more info, see this tutorial:

The Enable User Data setting allows you to pass arbitrary data into the user-data key of the DigitalOcean Metadata service. You can then retrieve that data on your droplet by running:

curl -w "\n" http://169.254.169.254/metadata/v1/user-data

On it’s own, that’s not very exciting but it allows for some interesting things when you combine it with a program called CloudInit that is installed by default on Ubuntu 14.04 and up as well as CentOS 7. It processes the user data and runs it on the droplet. For instance, you could put a bash script in there and it will be run on first boot. People use this to do a lot of initial set up on their droplets like installing packages. For more info, see this tutorial:

The Enable User Data setting allows you to pass arbitrary data into the user-data key of the DigitalOcean Metadata service. You can then retrieve that data on your droplet by running:

curl -w "\n" http://169.254.169.254/metadata/v1/user-data

On it’s own, that’s not very exciting but it allows for some interesting things when you combine it with a program called CloudInit that is installed by default on Ubuntu 14.04 and up as well as CentOS 7. It processes the user data and runs it on the droplet. For instance, you could put a bash script in there and it will be run on first boot. People use this to do a lot of initial set up on their droplets like installing packages. For more info, see this tutorial:

The Enable User Data setting allows you to pass arbitrary data into the user-data key of the DigitalOcean Metadata service. You can then retrieve that data on your droplet by running:

curl -w "\n" http://169.254.169.254/metadata/v1/user-data

On it’s own, that’s not very exciting but it allows for some interesting things when you combine it with a program called CloudInit that is installed by default on Ubuntu 14.04 and up as well as CentOS 7. It processes the user data and runs it on the droplet. For instance, you could put a bash script in there and it will be run on first boot. People use this to do a lot of initial set up on their droplets like installing packages. For more info, see this tutorial:

The Enable User Data setting allows you to pass arbitrary data into the user-data key of the DigitalOcean Metadata service. You can then retrieve that data on your droplet by running:

curl -w "\n" http://169.254.169.254/metadata/v1/user-data

On it’s own, that’s not very exciting but it allows for some interesting things when you combine it with a program called CloudInit that is installed by default on Ubuntu 14.04 and up as well as CentOS 7. It processes the user data and runs it on the droplet. For instance, you could put a bash script in there and it will be run on first boot. People use this to do a lot of initial set up on their droplets like installing packages. For more info, see this tutorial:

The Enable User Data setting allows you to pass arbitrary data into the user-data key of the DigitalOcean Metadata service. You can then retrieve that data on your droplet by running:

curl -w "\n" http://169.254.169.254/metadata/v1/user-data

On it’s own, that’s not very exciting but it allows for some interesting things when you combine it with a program called CloudInit that is installed by default on Ubuntu 14.04 and up as well as CentOS 7. It processes the user data and runs it on the droplet. For instance, you could put a bash script in there and it will be run on first boot. People use this to do a lot of initial set up on their droplets like installing packages. For more info, see this tutorial:

The Enable User Data setting allows you to pass arbitrary data into the user-data key of the DigitalOcean Metadata service. You can then retrieve that data on your droplet by running:

curl -w "\n" http://169.254.169.254/metadata/v1/user-data

On it’s own, that’s not very exciting but it allows for some interesting things when you combine it with a program called CloudInit that is installed by default on Ubuntu 14.04 and up as well as CentOS 7. It processes the user data and runs it on the droplet. For instance, you could put a bash script in there and it will be run on first boot. People use this to do a lot of initial set up on their droplets like installing packages. For more info, see this tutorial: