# The MariaDB configuration file
#
# The MariaDB/MySQL tools read configuration files in the following order:
# 0. "/etc/mysql/my.cnf" symlinks to this file, reason why all the rest is read.
# 1. "/etc/mysql/mariadb.cnf" (this file) to set global defaults,
# 2. "/etc/mysql/conf.d/*.cnf" to set global options.
# 3. "/etc/mysql/mariadb.conf.d/*.cnf" to set MariaDB-only options.
# 4. "~/.my.cnf" to set user-specific options.
#
# If the same option is defined multiple times, the last one will apply.
#
# One can use all long options that the program supports.
# Run program with --help to get a list of available options and with
# --print-defaults to see which it would actually understand and use.
#
# If you are new to MariaDB, check out https://mariadb.com/kb/en/basic-mariadb-articles/

#
# This group is read both by the client and the server
# use it for options that affect everything
#
[client-server]
# Port or socket location where to connect
# port = 3306
socket = /run/mysqld/mysqld.sock

# Import all .cnf files from configuration directory
!includedir /etc/mysql/conf.d/
!includedir /etc/mysql/mariadb.conf.d/

That’s my my.cnf file, there is no bind-address in it, can someone help me out?
Thanks.

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1 answer

Hi there @benjibordne,

What I could suggest is using the grep command to look for the bind-address definition in the /etc/mysql directory:

  • sudo grep -r 'bind-address' /etc/mysql/*

It is most likely defined in a file inside the /etc/mysql/mariadb.conf.d/ directory.

Hope that this helps.
Regards,
Bobby

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