Should DNS be configured with DO or with the Domain Registrar?

July 30, 2015 2k views
DNS DigitalOcean Ubuntu

My domains are registered with Hover.

It looks like I can configure my DNS details at Hover (with nameserver being DO).

And almost the exact same config options show up in DNS settings for DO.

So, should I be configuring them in one or the other or both? (And why please?)

(Note: In case this detail is needed: I'm trying to set up MX records for a MailServer that will manage email for 4 domains that are set up on a single Droplet via Apache Virtual Hosts. I'm on Ubuntu 14.04.)

4 comments
  • DNS is the first point of entry to your domain. It will inform the requestor to route it's connection to correct IPs. For example, your A-record informs the requestor where your domain website resides. Similarly, your MX-record informs the requestor where your email exchange resides.

    If hardly matters where you host your DNS however, it may so happen that you would want to use certain features of the DNS host and you would want to go with it. Other than that, it is DNS host, with same functions as explained above!

    Hope this helps!

    --
    Regards
    Saurabh

    Servopia.com
    Managed Cloud Hosting For PHP Applications On DigitalOcean IaaS

  • @saurabh Appreciate the reply. So... if Hover and DO have contradictory information in the DNS for the same domain (e.g. MX record points to different sub-domains), which one wins?

  • As explained earlier, the DNS which holds your name server i.e. NS records, will ultimately win.

    Suppose at Hover if you point name servers to DO, then the request will not scan any other record on Hove but directly go to DO. However, if you have not pointed your NS to DO then it will read all entries only from Hover!

    Hope this helps!

  • I would recommend configuring DNS at DO as they use CloudFlare. So DO's nameservers are faster than the registrar's NS.

1 Answer

This question was answered by @saurabh:

DNS is the first point of entry to your domain. It will inform the requestor to route it's connection to correct IPs. For example, your A-record informs the requestor where your domain website resides. Similarly, your MX-record informs the requestor where your email exchange resides.

If hardly matters where you host your DNS however, it may so happen that you would want to use certain features of the DNS host and you would want to go with it. Other than that, it is DNS host, with same functions as explained above!

Hope this helps!

--
Regards
Saurabh

Servopia.com
Managed Cloud Hosting For PHP Applications On DigitalOcean IaaS

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