Tutorial

How To Build a "Hello World" Application with Koa

Updated on April 19, 2021
author

Olayinka Omole

How To Build a "Hello World" Application with Koa

Introduction

Koa is a new web framework created by the team behind Express. It aims to be a modern and more minimalist version of Express.

Some of its characteristics are its support and reliance on new JavaScript features such as generators and async/await. Koa also does not ship with any middleware though it can be extended using custom and existing plugins.

In this article, you will learn more about the Koa framework and build an app to get familiar with its functionality and philosophy.

Prerequisites

If you would like to follow along with this article, you will need:

Note: This tutorial has been revised from Koa 1.0 to Koa 2.0. Refer to the migration documentation for updating your 1.0 implementations.

This tutorial was verified with Node v15.14.0, npm v7.10.0, koa v2.13.1, @koa/router v10.0.0, and koa-ejs v4.3.0.

Step 1 — Setting Up the Project

To begin, create a new directory for your project. This can be done by copying and running the command below in your terminal:

  1. mkdir koa-example

Note: You can give your project any name, but this article will be using koa-example as the project name and directory.

At this point, you have created your project directory koa-example. Navigate to the newly created project directory.

  1. cd koa-example

Then, initialize your Node project from inside the directory.

  1. npm init -y

After running the npm init command, you will have a package.json file with the default configuration.

Next, run this command to install Koa:

  1. npm install koa@2.13.1

Your application is now ready to use Koa.

Step 2 — Creating a Koa Server

First, create the index.js file. Then, using your code editor of choice, open the index.js file and add the following lines of code:

index.js
'use strict';

const Koa = require('koa');
const app = new Koa();

app.use(ctx => {
  ctx.body = 'Hello World';
});

app.listen(1234);

In the code above, you created a Koa application that runs on port 1234. You can run the application using the command:

  1. node index.js

And visit the application on http://localhost:1234.

Step 3 — Adding Routing and View Rendering

As mentioned earlier, Koa.js does not ship with any contained middleware and unlike its predecessor, Express, it does not handle routing by default.

In order to implement routes in your Koa app, you will install a middleware library for routing in Koa, Koa Router.

Open your terminal window and run the following command:

  1. npm install @koa/router@10.0.0

Note: Previously koa-router was the recommended package, but the @koa/router is now the officially supported package.

To make use of the router in your application, amend your index.js file:

index.js
'use strict';

const Koa = require('koa');
const Router = require('@koa/router');

const app = new Koa();
const router = new Router();

router.get('koa-example', '/', (ctx) => {
  ctx.body = 'Hello World';
});

app
  .use(router.routes())
  .use(router.allowedMethods());

app.listen(1234);

This code defines a route on the base URL of your application (http://localhost:1234) and registers this route to your Koa application.

For more information on route definition in Koa.js applications, visit the Koa Router library documentation.

As previously established, Koa comes as a minimalistic framework, therefore, to implement view rendering with a template engine you will have to install a middleware library. There are several libraries to choose from but in this article, you will use Koa ejs.

Open your terminal window and run the following command:

  1. npm install koa-ejs@4.3.0

Next, amend your index.js file to register your templating with the snippet below:

index.js
'use strict';

const Koa = require('koa');
const Router = require('@koa/router');
const render = require('koa-ejs');
const path = require('path');

const app = new Koa();
const router = new Router();

render(app, {
  root: path.join(__dirname, 'views'),
  layout: 'index',
  viewExt: 'html',
  cache: false,
  debug: true
});

router.get('koa-example', '/', (ctx) => {
  ctx.body = 'Hello World';
});

app
  .use(router.routes())
  .use(router.allowedMethods());

app.listen(1234);

In your template registering, you defined the root directory of your view files, the extension of the view files, and the base view file (which other views extend).

Now that you have registered your template middleware, amend your route definition to render a template file:

index.js
// ...

router.get('koa-example', '/', (ctx) => {
  let koalaFacts = [];

  koalaFacts.push({
    meta_name: 'Color',
    meta_value: 'Black and white'
  });

  koalaFacts.push({
    meta_name: 'Native Country',
    meta_value: 'Australia'
  });

  koalaFacts.push({
    meta_name: 'Animal Classification',
    meta_value: 'Mammal'
  });

  koalaFacts.push({
    meta_name: 'Life Span',
    meta_value: '13 - 18 years'
  });

  koalaFacts.push({
    meta_name: 'Are they bears?',
    meta_value: 'No'
  });

  return ctx.render('index', {
    attributes: koalaFacts
  });
})

// ...

Your base route renders the index.html file found in the views directory.

Now, create this directory and file. The open index.html and add the following lines of code:

views/index.html
<h2>Koala - a directory Koala of attributes</h2>
<ul class="list-group">
  <% attributes.forEach( function(attribute) { %>
    <li class="list-group-item">
      <%= attribute.meta_name %> - <%= attribute.meta_value %>
    </li>
  <% }) %>
</ul>

Now, when running the application and observing it in a web browser will display the following:

Output
Koala - a directory Koala of attributes Color - Black and white Native Country - Australia Animal Classification - Mammal Life Span - 13 - 18 years Are they bears? - No

For more options with using the koa-ejs template middleware, visit the library documentation.

Step 4 — Handling Errors and Responses

Koa handles errors by defining an error middleware early in your entry point file. The error middleware must be defined early because only errors from middleware defined after the error middleware will be caught.

Using your index.js file as an example, make the following changes to the code:

index.js
'use strict';

const Koa = require('koa');
const Router = require('@koa/router');
const render = require('koa-ejs');
const path = require('path');

const app = new Koa();
const router = new Router();

app.use(async (ctx, next) => {
  try {
    await next()
  } catch(err) {
    console.log(err.status)
    ctx.status = err.status || 500;
    ctx.body = err.message;
  }
});

// ...

This block of code will catch any error thrown during the execution of your application.

You can test this by throwing an error in the function body of the route you defined:

index.js
// ...

router.get('error', '/error', (ctx) => {
  ctx.throw(500, 'internal server error');
});

app
  .use(router.routes())
  .use(router.allowedMethods());

app.listen(1234);

Now, when running the application and observing /error in a web browser will display the following:

Output
internal server error

The Koa response object is usually embedded in its context object. Using route definition, let’s show an example of setting responses:

index.js
// ...

router.get('status', '/status', (ctx) => {
  ctx.status = 200;
  ctx.body   = 'ok';
})

app
  .use(router.routes())
  .use(router.allowedMethods());

app.listen(1234);

Now, when running the application and observing /status in a web browser will display the following:

Output
ok

Your application now handles errors and responses.

Conclusion

In this article, you had a brief introduction to Koa and how to implement some common functionalities in a Koa project. Koa is a minimalist and flexible framework that can be extended to more functionality than this article has shown. Because of its futuristic similarity to Express, some have even described it as Express 5.0 in spirit.

Thanks for learning with the DigitalOcean Community. Check out our offerings for compute, storage, networking, and managed databases.

Learn more about our products


About the authors
Default avatar
Olayinka Omole

author

Still looking for an answer?

Ask a questionSearch for more help

Was this helpful?
 
1 Comments


This textbox defaults to using Markdown to format your answer.

You can type !ref in this text area to quickly search our full set of tutorials, documentation & marketplace offerings and insert the link!

How can I deploy this app in a Serverless or other Cloud services?

Try DigitalOcean for free

Click below to sign up and get $200 of credit to try our products over 60 days!

Sign up

Join the Tech Talk
Success! Thank you! Please check your email for further details.

Please complete your information!

Featured on Community

Get our biweekly newsletter

Sign up for Infrastructure as a Newsletter.

Hollie's Hub for Good

Working on improving health and education, reducing inequality, and spurring economic growth? We'd like to help.

Become a contributor

Get paid to write technical tutorials and select a tech-focused charity to receive a matching donation.

Welcome to the developer cloud

DigitalOcean makes it simple to launch in the cloud and scale up as you grow — whether you're running one virtual machine or ten thousand.

Learn more
DigitalOcean Cloud Control Panel